(Source: wildletter, via tessellating-constellations)

typeworship:

Botany Alphabet

Beautifully observed lettering by Sasha Proodof Brooklyn. Part of a self promotional piece. I love the ‘R’ shown in the top image.

Via: betype:

(via ijisu-chan)

sosuperawesome:

Katie Wilson

Shop

(via waitingforanewyear)

mossofthewoodsjewelry:

Bird’s Foot Trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) Botany Resin Pendant

(via selfdestructiveyouth)

(Source: hipsterttoi, via tim-in-ruislip)

visualgraphc:

David Milan: Personal Poster

visualgraphc:

David Milan: Personal Poster

phoebethatcher:

Mushroom Primer, 2013, pen & ink. 

A 12-page zine/booklet, featuring a big diagram on the center spread. Print-your-own*, or, if you know me in real life, I’ll print you one on request ($2 apiece). 

*Make sure to trick your printer into not cutting off the borders (like in the second picture down). 

(via scientificillustration)

The Fratellis – Whistle For The Choir (248 plays)

some-good-songs:

Whistle For The Choir  »  The Fratellis

Is it out of line if I were simply bold to say "Would you be mine"?

(via daft-dreams)

visualgraphc:

Rachel Maves: Norwegian Wood

visualgraphc:

Rachel Maves: Norwegian Wood

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 18, 1925: Hitler Publishes Mein Kampf
On this day in 1925, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler published the first volume of his autobiographical manifesto, Mein Kampf (“My Struggle”) in which he explained his racial and political ideologies, which would become the foundation for the Nazi Party. Mein Kampf was a bitter and anti-Semitic narrative, worshiping power and discrediting morality, serving as a blueprint for Hitler’s plan for Nazi world domination.
For the first time ever, the story emerges of a group of Americans who lived in Berlin in the early days of Hitler’s rise to power.  Watch as PBS NewsHour’s Margaret Warner speaks with author and former journalist Andrew Nagorski about his book, “Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power”.
Photo: Wikimedia Commons

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 18, 1925: Hitler Publishes Mein Kampf

On this day in 1925, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler published the first volume of his autobiographical manifesto, Mein Kampf (“My Struggle”) in which he explained his racial and political ideologies, which would become the foundation for the Nazi Party. Mein Kampf was a bitter and anti-Semitic narrative, worshiping power and discrediting morality, serving as a blueprint for Hitler’s plan for Nazi world domination.

For the first time ever, the story emerges of a group of Americans who lived in Berlin in the early days of Hitler’s rise to power.  Watch as PBS NewsHour’s Margaret Warner speaks with author and former journalist Andrew Nagorski about his book, “Hitlerland: American Eyewitnesses to the Nazi Rise to Power”.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons


jd banke

jd banke

(Source: cactuslands, via darksilenceinsuburbia)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Isabel Brito Farré

From Anostalgia series

1. Lights

2. Hot Dogs

3. Flag

4. Lemonade

5. Public Telephone

6. Poms-poms

7. Filter Coffee

8. Basket

9. Shoe shine

10. Laundromat

Thread on paper

2010

sosuperawesome:

Prints, notebooks, cards and postcard sets by Quill and Fox on Etsy

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

sosuperawesome:

Embroidered brooches by cOnieco

(Source: sexpansion, via carolineproper)